Saturday, January 9, 2010

Professional Speaker, September 1997

The Feel Fantastic Formula for Speakers on the Road
By Maye Musk MS MS RD

As speakers, we motivate people to make changes. As role models, we need to look healthy and vital. In order to achieve this image, we have to control our eating habits and remain active despite often grueling travel schedules.

It’s a struggle to eat well and be active on the road. Delayed planes, holdovers, lost hotel reservations, boredom, fatigue, frustration, and stress can thwart our carefully planned eating and exercise goals. All this and we’re expected to ignore the wonderful, delicious foods thrust at us at banquets and luncheons. So what can we do to feel fantastic on a hectic schedule? Let’s find out:
1. In the Air
The key to success is planning and moderation. If you travel first class, you’ll be tempted to overindulge as you are offered alcohol, snacks, heavy meals and decadent desserts. By the time you land, you are full, tired and are asking yourself “Why did I do that?” Too much food and rich food will drain your energy. Drink less alcohol, eat smaller portions and choose lower fat foods to maximize your vitality.
If you travel coach, even though everyone complains about the food, most still eat it because it’s there. Airplane meals are not necessarily low fat and the occasional high fat meal need not concern you. For frequent flyers, again eat small portions or order a special meal 24 - 48 hours in advance, such as low-fat, low-calorie, or fruit platter options. Remember, vegetarian doesn’t necessarily mean low fat.
2. Cure Jet Lag

If flying east on an overnight flight, try to sleep on the plane. Eating only high-carbohydrate foods (bread, rice, pastas, fruit and vegetables) before and after boarding should help you get some zzz’s. Carbohydrates stimulate release of sleep-inducing chemicals (neurotransmitters such as serotonin). Upon arrival, eat a protein-rich meal (meat, poultry, fish, cheese and egg), because protein stimulates release of other chemicals (such as norepinephrin) that promote alertness and wakefulness. Add coffee or tea for that extra perk.
For westward travel, reverse the protein-carbohydrate regimen. Eat protein-rich foods and coffee before and during your flight. Upon arrival, load up on high-carbohydrate foods and avoid caffeine --- unless, of course, you have to give a presentation when you arrive. In this case, drinking fluids can minimize jet lag. Drink one glass of water every hour and on trips over six hours, avoid alcohol and salty foods that dehydrate, such as nuts, pretzels and tomato juice.
3. Eating on the Road

Once again, the key to success is planning and moderation. Never let yourself become too hungry. If you are famished, you’ll put any food into your mouth as quickly as possible. Keep nutritious snacks such as whole-wheat crackers or fruit in your hotel room, briefcase or purse for emergencies. When I arrive at a hotel, I’ll help myself to an apple from the reception desk, order a whole-wheat roll and fruit from room service, or run to a store for yogurt and fruit. Have a snack before you go out to eat so you can take your time and decide what you really feel like eating otherwise you’ll finish the breadbasket before you’ve ordered your meal!
4. Keep the Energy Level High

Restaurant portions are often large. Ask for smaller portions or share a serving with a companion. When I’m traveling, I like to order a light meal such as a spinach salad with goat cheese and dressing on the side, a glass of wine if I don’t need to be alert, a roll without butter, and coffee (decaffeinated if in the evening) with milk. Although goat cheese is high in fat, I love the taste and the portion is small. I don’t deprive myself and I don’t expect my clients to either. If the restaurant has one of my favorite desserts, I’ll have it if someone will share it with me. Otherwise, I leave it.
What about buffets? Start by strolling around and checking out the entire buffet selection. Decide to fill your plate only once and choose low fat items. If something fattening tempts you, just take a taste - often one or two bites is all you need to satisfy a craving for a high-fat food. For dessert, try fresh fruit and a scoop of ice cream. What a picture! No regrets or guilt feelings. The next time you go to a buffet, go with a different attitude. Put yourself in this picture. It’s worth it.
Hotels now offer nutritious breakfasts consisting of bran-type cereals, low-fat milk, yogurt, boiled eggs, whole-wheat toast and fresh fruit - all good choices for keeping energy high. (Sausage, bacon, fried eggs and hashed browns will zap your energy.) For lunches and dinners, replace garlic bread with a whole-wheat roll, cream soup with a bouillon-based soup, a deluxe hamburger with a small hamburger, and fried chicken with a stir-fry. Ask that food be prepared fat-free and served with gravies and sauces on the side.
5. Eating for Health

Support and boost your immune system by eating plenty of whole grain foods, legumes, fresh fruits and vegetables. Besides essential fiber, these foods also contain vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, which protect you from heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Just taking supplements won’t do it. For example, a carrot contains fiber, vitamins and 60 chemicals (called carotenoids) that contribute to your overall health. A supplement might only have one such chemical - beta-carotene. Besides a carrot tastes much better, and is more satisfying to eat! Order a salad, vegetable soup or steamed vegetables at every lunch and dinner. If you are unable to find a variety of foods on your trip, and insist on taking a multivitamin supplement, make sure it contains no more than 100 percent of the Recommended Dietary Allowances.
A vegetarian diet has to include more whole grains, beans, nuts, fruits and vegetables to get the same amount of nutrients as people who do eat meat, fish, chicken, milk and eggs. If you’re vegetarian, increase your plant consumption, but don’t replace meat with high-fat high-sugar foods such as doughnuts.
When choosing vegetables and fruits, look for color - the brighter the color, the more nutritious the food. For example, romaine lettuce has six times as much vitamin C, eight times as much beta-carotene and twice as much folacin (a B vitamin) as iceberg lettuce. And go for flavor. Evidence is mounting which supports the protective properties of garlic, thyme, oregano, celery, fennel, peppermint, flaxseed, ginger, nuts, licorice, basil, and hot chilies. Add them to your dishes.
6. Get enough rest

This can be a challenge for speakers with hectic schedules. Rest is essential for good health - especially for those of us on the road. Sleep deprivation can lead to raiding the hotel room refrigerator in search of instant energy. Instead, go for a walk, have a massage or manicure, take a nap, relax for ten minutes, order tea, or take a hot bath. If your energy is still low, have a healthful snack - a piece of fruit, a small salad, a whole-wheat roll. You will feel refreshed and ready to face the world again.
7. Move!

For instant, long-lasting energy, use every opportunity to be active. Use hotel gyms; stretch and do abdominal exercises in your room; walk the halls and stairs; or walk and explore the city. Feel the mood enhancing endorphins click in. The fresh air and exercise will help refuel your energy.
8. Don’t beat yourself up

One fat-full meal does not make or break a healthy lifestyle. Don’t feel guilty or let it upset you. The next day, resume your healthy routine. If you eat healthily 80 percent of the time, you will feel fantastic all of the time!


Dietitians to the Stars

by Hannah Fiske, Today's Dietitian, February 2003

An article about dietitians with celebrity clients:
"Many celebrities who come to see me are totally confused because they need to be thin but just don't know what to eat. Some are naturally thin and have never had a problem with weight, but may have noticed their energy levels dropping because they are trying to follow all the latest diets and end up eating things that are completely wrong for them."
Once their eating habits are normalized, she adds, her clients feel so much better that they wonder why they never considered simple common sense in the first place.
"When I go to a reception with models and actresses, all I hear is, 'Don't bring me carbs, don't bring me carbs.' They have to be so slim that they can only eat just a little, so there seems to be no point in tasting the delicious desserts."
At most social functions, Musk adds, there is surprisingly very little healthy food to be had, and celebrities cannot afford to let themselves go to town on the fried, starchy foods. "They have to stick to fruits and vegetables, and have to search hard for some protein separated from the starch that will harm their caloric intake."
"It annoys me that people are often not offered more healthy choices. Sometimes, at certain high-society receptions, they serve trays of little vegetable and fish appetizers and the portions are very small. They are delicate and beautifully done. When you see them, you know you can get through the evening without having to go vegetarian."
Because, just like the rest of us, they enjoy eating and hate feeling hungry, Musk advises her celebrity clients to eat a large amount of vegetables and fruits every day. "When you add three fruits and four vegetables, it looks like so much food. It is also important to ensure that clients take in an appropriate amount of dairy, she adds, since they tend to eat unhealthfully when they work."
"When I was shooting a commercial a few weeks ago, we could eat a wonderful bowl of cereal with fruit and skim milk, or else we could have a three-egg omelet with bacon and sausage. There are choices to be made, and the people working behind the scenes carrying all the heavy props need those calories."
Actors and models, however, should opt for the ligther fare, Musk says, despite the fact that many 18-year-old models she works with eat whatever they want and never develop a bulge. "It never occurs to them to load up with vegetables and fruit, though, because they are just typical teenagers."

SOUTH AFRICAN FOOD - INTERVIEW

Current Health 2, November 2003
By Dee Murphy, R.D., L.D.

South Africa is home to many different cultures. For instance, in one part of the country, Great Britain influences people’s tastes and manners. In other parts of the country, Portuguese, Jewish, Dutch, French, Indonesian, or Malay customs may dominate.
Some favorite foods include bobotie (meatloaf with curry), vegetables prepared with butter and sugar, koeksusters (fried twirled dough dipped in syrup), and biltong (dried salted meat). South Africans also eat elephant and Mopani worms, but tourists seldom do. Maye Musk, a registered dietitian in private practice in South Africa for 20 years before she moved to North America, says that she loves the traditional African food. “Puthu pap, a stiff cornmeal porridge that is served with meat, tomato, and onion sauce, is delicious,” says Musk. “It tastes very much like polenta [mush] but is white and looks like mashed potato. Because many Africans are lactose intolerant, the cooks are very happy when milk goes sour. Then it can be used to make sour puthu pap.”


Media Savvy Musts

Feel Confident at Your Next Media Interview

Believe me, there is nothing scary about a media interview. They just want your information. In all my years of being interviewed on radio and television, for newspapers and magazines, only once was a former friendly host hostile, catching me off guard. However, within ten minutes he was eating out of my hand. Keep to your facts, have a sense of humor and you can handle any interview with ease.
The first time I was in the media I was two years old, when my adventurous parents moved from Canada to South Africa. I grew up with the media around our family as we went searching for the Lost City of the Kalahari in Namibia every year. They were always nice and real people.
In my teens, I started doing nutrition interviews as a student because my professor asked me to. She was nervous when she was asked a question she couldn’t answer. As a student, it didn’t matter if I fluffed it. As it turned out, the questions were easy so I started off fearless.
This isn’t marketing to the media (another topic) but what to do if the media contacts you. The “musts” can be found in any media-training manual. These are the “musts” from my experience.
Newspaper, magazine and radio interviews:
a. Return calls immediately. Understand deadlines for newspaper and radio interviews; magazine interviews have a longer timeline.
b. If they are referring to an article or study, ask them to fax it first and call them back when you have your facts in order.
c. Prepare for the interview: Ask if it is live or taped and who is the target audience.
d. Research the subject and suggest questions. After your suggested questions, add ADA info: For a registered dietitian in your area, go to The American Dietetic Association’s website at www.eatright.org.
e. When answering, be honest, not perfect.
f. Be prepared for disappointments. Interviews of four hours or counseling a magazine reader for three months can result in a one-sentence quote,and not necessarily a good one.
Television Interviews:
When I gave a talk for the Nutrition Entrepreneurs on this topic, Media Savvy Musts, I showed an edited tape of ten of my television interviews. I explained the preparation beforehand, why I chose to wear what I did, what surprised me, and how good I felt afterwards. Even though the tape showed the best parts of my interviews in it, members liked to know I was normal.
a. Spontaneous interviews can be improved on if you know all the questions beforehand. Do the best you can and don’t beat yourself up afterwards. The tape can always be edited later.
b. Carefully worded and written facts sound better to your ear, spontaneity sounds better to the listeners.
c. Check with the producer that your name and credentials are correct. Add MS and RD but not FADA, CDE etc. MS, RD is confusing enough to the consumer.
d. Bring props, don’t be a talking head.
Spokesperson work - the difference:
a. You will be media trained. This can be a harrowing experience but prepares you for the worst (which has never happened to me). With practice it gets easier.
b. Food companies are not going to put words in your mouth you don’t agree with. They want the facts to be correct and for you to feel comfortable and confident with the message. Of course, if this is not the case, run.
c. Television interviews are about your message, spokesperson work is about the company’s key messages and their image.
d. Practice transitioning to your key messages when the host goes off the subject.
e. Don’t sound like you’re advertising, your client won’t want that either.
f. “Desksides” means sitting at the desks of health editors and chatting about the product or program.
Appearance:
1. For phone interviews, pajamas are fine!
2. For television: Bold colors are suggested in every media-training manual. Patterns “dance” and distract. My “must” for women: wear a jacket. When they mike you, you don’t need strangers wiring inside your dress/blouse.
3. Look stylish. If you don’t understand fashion, have someone with taste whom you trust, help you. I do.
4. No big jewelry that will tap the mike.
5. Neat hair. You cannot believe how attractive, natural-looking wisps look messy on a close-up. For women, overdo your makeup otherwise you’ll look washed out. The plus side is that it will wash out your wrinkles as well. Men will need some powder; no shiny faces here. If there’s a makeup artist, ask for a touch up.
6. Look under your shoes. The soles may be worn and show if you’re perched on a chair.
7. Look in the mirror just before you go on camera; sometimes a skew tie or necklace is distracting to the audience.
The interview:
a. Speak in short sentences (sound bytes). I still find that tough. Answering the question directly helps. After that, go into more detail.
b. Don’t look at the camera; look at the host, unless you are actually speaking to the camera.
c. Show enthusiasm, don't speak in one tone or you may sound boring.
d. Smile. Talk as if you are talking to friends in your living room.
e. Stay seated until they tell you to leave. Watch TV interviews. You will notice the host and guest continue talking while the music plays and titles scroll.
Afterwards:
To further your career:
a. Start a database with your television, radio, magazine and newspaper contacts: name, company, address, telephone number, email, what was said and done. You may need them at a later date.
a. Send a thank you email (mail is not popular at the news media anymore)
b. Keep copies of all interviews and add to your resume.
c. Edit your tapes.
d. Laser copy articles and magazine covers. See how I’ve done it on www.mayemusk.com.
Enjoy and keep our profession in show business.

Friday, January 8, 2010

HealthNewsDigest.com May 2009

DIETITIANS AS PERSONAL LIFE COACHES

With the multitude of information readily available in today’s high-speed world, many Americans feel they know how to eat well, but simply lack the ability to handle life’s obstacles that interfere with one’s quest to stick to that healthy eating plan. You need the tools for success from a reliable source that creates and tailors an individualized plan that takes into account lifestyle and medical issues…you need a registered dietitian. The profession of dietetics is an accredited role in the medical community. The knowledge dietitians have gained is science-based, leaving quackery and fad diets in the trash where they belong. We have no quick fixes as there are none; positive change can only come from the dedication you have to changing unhealthy habits as you realize your health is worth more than your current nutrition state.

Good nutrition is important, not only for the obvious health benefits, but also for feeling good. When you overeat you feel too sluggish to work out, depressed over losing control, resulting in a reduced sense of self-worth. When you plan meals with your dietitian and actually enjoy the foods you select, you become happier and more active as you are finally making an effort to be your best you!

THE MOST COMMON OBSTACLES AND HOW DIETITIANS HELP YOU TO OVERCOME THEM

The many obstacles to making healthy food choices can be categorized under three main themes - eating when you’re not hungry, eating for emotional reasons and unplanned eating. You may identify with some of these complaints at different times during the day or at different stages across your lifespan. Dietitians help you to recognize the obstacles you’re frequently facing, working as a personal life coach to help you through them to strive for optimal health.

OVEREATING
“I’m never hungry”
“Do you eat when you’re hungry?” This is the first question I ask those clients who want to lose weight. Most of them say, “I’m never hungry.” So why do they eat? There are so many reasons for overeating - for enjoyment, sharing a social occasion, and because the food is there. If you only ate when you were hungry, or at least tried to hone in on your body’s natural satiety cues, chances of you gaining weight would be minimized.

LOSING CONTROL
“I’ve lost control”
A big misconception among Americans revolves around the term “dieting.” While strict dieting is not the solution to weight loss, eating sensibly is. But how do you achieve this goal? Remember how good you feel when you do make healthy food choices and remain active. Decide that you want to have that good feeling every day. The worst thing you could do is beat yourself up over a “bad day”…ignore it, move on and aim for healthy food choices at your very next meal. Remember, don’t starve or deprive yourself - you’ll only be setting yourself up for failure again.

EATING UNDER STRESS
“I eat under stress”
When life throws you a curveball, nutrition and healthy eating seem to be the first thing that suffers. The next time you are stressed, pause for thirty seconds and breathe deeply. You need to remember and reflect on how you felt the last time after you ate under stress– chances are the feeling was awful. Dietitians provide you with ideas to conquer the habits that make you feel bad. It will give you a feeling of strength and control.

EATING FOR COMFORT
“I felt sorry for myself as my body grew bigger and found sympathy in bags of cookies. No wonder I gained forty-five pounds.”
Food is a comfort. It was given to us as children whenever we hurt ourselves or when we cried. So it’s only natural that we should turn to food when we’re under stress. We regard certain foods as “trigger” foods, they trigger a binging reaction; once we start on this item of food, we can’t stop. The dietitian’s solution to this problem: do something else that will make you feel better immediately to get your mind off a path that only leads to gluttony. Walk or run around the block, phone a friend…or better yet, phone your dietitian! But if you still feel low and reach for the cookies, indulge in two cookies with a glass of low-fat milk.

CLOSET EATER
“When no one is around, I sneak into the kitchen and finish off the meal and dessert”
It is okay to eat all these foods, but you have to eat them in front of someone, anyone, never on your own. This way, you will not feel deprived, because everything will be available to you. If you still feel you cannot refrain from closet eating, keep the food out of your cupboards until you can handle the temptation responsibly. Truth be told, you really can eat everything, but only in moderate portions.

GUILT AND FOOD
“I feel guilty when I eat the wrong foods”
I hear the word guilty all the time. Guilty of what? Of eating a food you know is not nutritious? This is yet another negative attitude. It is imperative that you don’t relate “guilt” to food. It brings your mood down. If you overeat, you feel stuffed and uncomfortable. This is a physical feeling of discomfort; don’t make it an emotional feeling, too. Take away the fear and guilt you associate with different foods. You must enjoy the taste and pleasure of healthy eating. This is a different way of thinking and one you must learn.

DIET AND DEPRIVATION
“I feel deprived when I go on diet”
This attitude must change! If you’re going to a party or another event where the food choices are not necessarily “healthy,” choose half of what you would normally have and enjoy every mouthful. Make sure the food item is well prepared, tasty and fresh. Don’t waste your time on ordinary, boring foods. If you taste something and it’s not fabulous, leave it.

THE CLEAN-PLATE CLUB
“As a child, I was always told to finish everything on my plate because people were starving all over the world”
You are an adult now and can take responsibility for your own attitude towards food. You must not use your body as a garbage can, finishing food that should be thrown away. If you belong to the “clean plate club,” there are two strategies you can follow. When cooking at home, either cook smaller portions, or dish up smaller portions and put the extra food away for a meal the next day. If you’re at a restaurant, share the salad and main course with your companion or box half your entrée straight away to avoid the temptation to overeat.

EATING ON THE RUN
"I always eat on the run”
This is where it’s important to know your schedule. If you make the tuna fish sandwich yourself, it can be low in fat (6.5 grams fat and 300 calories), but a bought one is loaded with high-fat mayonnaise (21 grams fat and 450 calories). Spend five minutes each evening planning for tomorrow. Recognize the days in your upcoming week that look hectic and will require more preparation to avoid picking up junk food for convenience.

AFTERNOON HUNGER
“I am starved at 4 p.m.”
Late afternoon is a common time to be hungry. Recognize it as a real hunger, and not due to boredom, fatigue or stress. When you are hungry, you should eat. Plan to eat a filling snack before you’re starved, at about 3:30 p.m., and you’ll be ready to enjoy your meal at suppertime. Remember: do not go six hours without food or you’ll get too hungry. If you are the type of person who has trouble making the right afternoon choices, don’t let it get that far. Plan, plan, plan.

The keys to sensible eating are simply having an awareness of what you are eating and the moderation of food quantities you consume. It is inevitable that obstacles will arise in your ever changing days. Registered Dietitians are nearby to serve as your personal cheerleader, providing you with the skill-set to enjoy any food you desire no matter what you are facing. Find one on the Internet or go to www.eatright.org. To ensure an individual’s accreditation, look for ‘RD’ behind their name. Happy Eating!

Thursday, January 7, 2010

examiner.com 2009


Link between loneliness and obesity

By Stacey Smith

Nutritionist and dietitian, Maye Musk, MS RD, who has a private practice in New York city, asks all of her clients if they eat more when lonely, stressed, anxious, depressed, tired, or bored. She says, "I set them a meal and activity plan that suits their lifestyle. They keep track of everything they eat during the week and give me reasons for making poor eating choices."

Musk gives the following strategies to her clients who eat more when lonely:

* Only have nutritious foods in your home/office.

* Eat 2 fruits before anything sweet. They never feel like something sweet after 2 fruits.

* Eat 2 cups vegetables before anything fatty, crunchy and salty (like chips). After the veggies, they have no room for junk.

* Make notes of the times you are lonely. Plan to call a friend or family; go to a movie, go for a walk, take up a hobby, read a book, clean your home, garden, watch a gripping television story, get a dog - anything fun to take away that painful lonely feeling

She adds, "Once they conquer that lonely feeling and replace it with a good feeling, they become much happier people."

Madison Magazine Australia June 2009


ten slim-down secrets smart women swear by

By Siobhan Grogan

Know your weakness By Maye Musk, dietician and author of Feel Fantastic

To combat your afternoon sweet tooth or midnight munchies, Musk says “keep a small portion of very healthy food close by, so it’s the first thing to hand when the craving strikes. Try nuts and dried cranberries.”

Ontario’s Prevention System 2008


An Ounce of Prevention: Holiday Food Safety

by Maye Musk, MS, MS, RD

There is one “gift” no one wants to give or receive this holiday season — food poisoning. There are an estimated 2.2 million cases of food poisoning per year in Canada, with up to 99 per cent of cases going unreported.

About Food Poisoning

The most common symptoms of food poisoning are cramps, vomiting, and diarrhea. Contracting food poisoning can be dangerous for infants, young children, senior citizens and people with weakened immune systems. Keep yourself and others healthy by taking the appropriate steps when preparing, cooking, serving and storing food.

A Healthy Habit

Up to half of all cases food poisoning stem from improper hand washing. Frequent and proper hand washing can also reduce the spread of the common cold and flu. If you are preparing or serving food, keep these techniques in mind:

* Wash hands front and back, up to your wrists, between fingers and under fingernails and rings.

* Wash hands in warm, soapy water before preparing foods and after handling raw meat, poultry and seafood.

* Dry hands with paper towels rather than hand towels, which can harbor bacteria.

Storing and Serving Food

Hot food that is being transported should be wrapped in foil and heavy towels, or transported in containers designed to keep food hot (60 degrees C or higher). If you will not be eating the hot food right away, you should place it in an oven to maintain an internal food temperature of 60 degrees C or higher, or refrigerate it immediately.

Cold food should maintain a temperature of 4 degrees C or lower. A cooler with ice or freezer packs should be used when transporting cold foods. You should also refrigerate cold food as soon as you receive it, if you don’t plan to eat it right away.

Always keep food covered and do not leave perishable food out for more than two hours - one hour in a warmer room.

Following these simple food safety tips will help ensure your festive gatherings are remembered for all the right reasons.

msnbc.com October 2008


Telling Your Honey, 'It's Time For A Diet'

By Bridget Murray Law

Don't nag. Constantly berating your partner only spurs conflict and resentment, says Maye Musk, a New York nutritionist and couples counselor. The targeted person will likely feel ugly, angry and depressed, leading to more weight gain. "It becomes a downward spiral," says Musk.

Don't sabotage. Bringing junk food into the house only fuels a partner's weight problem, says Musk. If you're inhaling potato chips on the sofa, your partner will most likely want to join you. It may seem obvious, but if your partner has dropped a few pounds, don't use food as a reward.

Fitness magazine July 2008


The Low-Carb Diet by Karen Ansel RD: The diet-myth buster

THE MYTH

Give up bread and pasta and the pounds will melt away.

THE TRUTH

Low-carb eating plans are a digestive nightmare, because they don't provide enough fiber, which frequently results in severe constipation, says Maye Musk, RD, a New York City-based dietitian. Healthy carbs are also crucial for energy. Stop eating them and you're likely to feel tired and grumpy all the time.

THE FIX

Eat good-for-you carbs. To make sure you get the nutrients you need, add four servings to your daily diet, suggests Musk. Try a slice of whole-grain bread, one-half cup cooked oatmeal, one-third cup brown rice and one-half cup whole-wheat pasta. Piling your plate with fiber-rich veggies such as spinach, broccoli, peas and asparagus can also help get things moving. (Legumes such as soybeans and lentils are also good fiber sources.) If that doesn't work, pour yourself a bowl of low-sugar, high-fiber cereal, such as All-Bran With Extra Fiber. Just one-quarter cup will supply you with more than six grams.

More magazine May 2007


The Hungry Woman's Guide to Healthy Eating

By Kristyn Kusek Lewis

After two decades as a nutrition counselor in her native South Africa and in Canada, Musk is in private practice in New York City

Q: How much do you worry about the number on the scale?

A: I weigh less than I did as a teenager, but it's hard work at any age. These days, I find I have to eat much less when I want to lose weight. My weight usually creeps up after I've been eating french fries and cheese toast during visits with my grandchildren, and my strategy is to do everything perfectly for a week to get those pounds off. That means no desserts, no refined carbs like white bread or white pasta and no alcohol. It's hard because I have an active social life, and there's nothing worse than going to a champagne-and-chocolate party and feeling deprived, sulking because I'm forcing myself to drink water. I hate it, but it works.

Q: What do you eat after a long day?

A: Cereal, half a banana and one percent milk - it's easy and satisfies my ever-present sweet tooth. I eat fortified, high-fiber types like Total and Cracklin' Oat Bran, so I know I'm getting plenty of vitamins and minerals. Sometimes I'll throw in dried cranberries, dried cherries and nuts and seeds to add even more phytonutrients and good fats, both of which are antiaging.

Q: Do you have favorite antiaging foods?

A: A lot of seafood - I eat at least two servings a week - and good fats like avocado and olive oil. I also think that looking young means staying in the right weight range. Women look older when they are overweight or too thin.

Q: Are there any so-called bad foods that over-40 women can relax about?

A: Red meat. It is one of my favorite foods and packed with iron, which so many women lack. Just be sensible about how much you eat: I'll go to a steak house, take home two-thirds of a steak and eat if for two more meals.

Q: How about caffeine?

A: Not a big deal. You're talking to someone who drinks two cups of coffee, two teas and two diet sodas before four in the afternoon. Then I drink decaf. I rarely drink plain water, because I don't like it; I only drink it after I work out or when I'm really thirsty.

Q: Do you use butter and other saturated fats?

A: That's where I draw the line. I've had a stick of butter in the fridge for months. Instead, I use the new soft margarine-like spreads, like Benecol and Take Control. They are fortified with plant stanol esters, which help keep my cholesterol in check.

Q: Are there any packaged foods that you love?

A: I like low-fat microwave butter-flavor popcorn made by Healthy Choice or Orville Redenbacher, and I love veggie burgers and portion-controlled cereal in small boxes. My favorites have at least four grams of fiber per serving.

Q: Do you exercise?

A: I hate to go to the gym, so I get it over with first thing in the morning and ride the bike. It's how I read the paper. Living in New York, I also walk everywhere - at least an hour a day.

Q: Describe an antiaging meal you enjoy regularly?

A: I like to go to the salad bar at my local deli and make a massive salad. I'll mix up lettuce, tomatoes, onion, corn, avocado, chickpeas, feta cheese, dried cranberries, walnuts and salmon. It's delicious and packed with nutrients.

Wine Report Winter 2006-2007


Cranberries - a nutritional powerhouse

by Hope S. Philbrick

"The reason I like to talk about cranberries is that lots of fruits and vegetables have antioxidants, but studies have shown that cranberries have the highest amount of antioxidants per calorie."

Another health benefit of cranberries: They're low in calories. Musk frequently advises her clients to add cranberries to their diets, especially those who are trying to lose weight. "I find dried cranberries are the easiest way to add cranberries. Put them in cereal every morning; enjoy them as an afternoon snack. An ounce of dried cranberries instead of a brownie satisfies a sweet tooth, and when you're trying to lose weight, you still have to feel good; there's a mode of psychology involved. Dried cranberries are a really nice treat when you finish a meal and want something sweet. Also, they are something you can actually take on an airline."

What about the naturally occurring sugar content of cranberries? "I don't worry about that, I've never had a client who overeats on any type of fruits or vegetables."

"You can get the recommended servings in very easily. Add cranberries to salads for a really nice treat. Mix cranberry juice with vodka for martinis. Cranberries should always be on your grocery list."

ABC News Aug 26, 2006


Bye-Bye Worries and -- Hopefully -- Obesity Program Lets Parents Screen Children's Lunches Digitally

by Michelle Hirsch

"I think something has to be done. We cannot carry on with children the way it is going, and programs like these are desperately needed in schools, where kids are left to their own devices," said dietitian and author Maye Musk.

"If parents help children change their eating habits, hopefully, many of these problems we are seeing today in kids won't follow them into adulthood," Musk said.

OK! Magazine March 20, 2006


By Ask Rachel

Dear Rachel: I want to go on a diet, but I don’t want to overdo it. How many calories should I aim to eat each day?

Answer: Eat at least 1,200 calories a day, says nutritionist Maye Musk, author of Feel Fantastic: Maye Musk’s Good Health Clinic. If you eat fewer calories than that, you may not get the nutrients you need and your body could go into starvation mode. This will slow down your metabolism, which will in turn slow down your weight-loss efforts. Plus, you will likely feel tired and irritable. “Plan a healthy diet of fruit, vegetables, low-fat dairy, whole grains and lean protein,” says Musk. A food diary will also help you keep track of exactly what – and how much – you eat each day.

Discovery Health January 23, 2005


Eating for Eye Health

by Jackie Newgent RD

Maye Musk, a registered dietitian, international speaker, and author of "Feel Fantastic" and "Executive Stamina" says, "Eating a variety of fruits and vegetables, especially dark-colored ones like carrots, broccoli and Hubbard squash" is important for the eyes. The deep-colored fruits and vegetables are typically "good sources of beta-carotene and many, many carotenoids," she adds. Beta-carotene and certain carotenoids (plant pigments) are just a handful of the array of nutrients linked to good eye health.

Your Diet magazine Fall 2004


The Diet Trick That Works

by Joanna Powell

When new clients come to Maye Musk for help losing weight, the New York City nutritionist begins with their diet history, asking for a list of everything they’ve eaten in a 24-hour period. Inevitably, “they don’t remember all of it”, she says. “ In most cases, if they ate what they think they eat, they would lose 5 lbs very quickly.” In fact, when Musk sends clients home with a simple meal plan and a food diary, “they generally drop 5 lbs in the first week,” she adds. “They tell me, I’d grab a muffin without even thinking about it,’ or ‘Before I starting writing it down, I didn’t realize I’d have a brownie in the afternoon, but now I have a fruit.”

After her clients reach their goal weight, Musk then sees them once a month. “At that they time they only keep a journal the last month of every month,” she says. “We find that for the first three weeks, their weight slowly creeps up, and then, during the week they write down what they are eating, the weight drops back. It’s all because they know they have to be accountable.”

Cosmetics magazine September 2004


What It’s Like To Be A Clinique “Happy” Model

By Dave Lackie

At age 56 Maye Musk is hitting her stride as a model.

The Canadian model and grandmother of three has just shot a television commercial for Macy’s, another commercial for The Gap, and will appear in an editorial spread in the September issue of Cargo magazine. Not to mention the editorial photos she shot for Martha Stewart Living. And if you caught the second-to-last episode of Sex and The City, you would have spotted Maye sipping a Manhattan at Candice Bergen’s cocktail party. “The set was built about six feet in the air and we had to climb a ladder to get to it. Once up there, it was a spectacular apartment,” she says. “ I have to say that Sarah Jessica Parker is the sweetest, chirpiest person I’ve ever met. She’d shoot a scene and then run over to the director and look at the shot. And her baby was always on set”. When it came time to shoot the scene, the director called action and actress Kristen Johnston delivered her lined describing how bored to death she was of New York. She stepped back and fell out the window. None of the extras knew this was going to happen so the look of shock on their faces was real. “We were horrified,” says Maye of the spectacle.

And as much as appearing on two episodes of Sex and The City was a thrill, the highlight of her career was landing the Clinique Happy Campaign. “I was walking on clouds when I got the call,” she says. “Modeling in New York is really tough. I audition five times a week and land one job per month. It’s that competitive.” Maye was first called to an initial meeting where a photographer snapped her photo and sent it to the client. She was then called to a follow-up meeting where she answered some questions about her life, walked back and forth and laughed. “That part was important. Laughing is what Happy is all about.” A week later she got the call. She was in.

“The fitting took place at the Silver Cups Studio in New York on a Sunday. There were racks and racks of fabulous clothes - I got to wear and incredible Gucci vintage skirt and Michael Knors top. Everyone was so friendly. Even the buffet was incredible. I returned a week later for three of the four days of shooting. There were 14 female models, two men and two kids. Everyone started the day off with a professional manicure and pedicure. I think there were four hair and make-up people for each model.” Framed photographer Peggy Sirota shot the campaign and began by shooting the entire group. Then, she’d start taking different combinations of models - a few girls with the men, girls with kids, etc. “It was a really wonderful experience.” A few months later, the ad campaign rolled out across the globe. “Four days after the shoot, a big box arrived at my apartment filled with Clinique Happy product. It was such a classy gesture. I was thrilled.”

Today's Dietitian June 2004


Justifying your value to prospective clients

by Kate Geagan

An article about how a dietitian can get what they deserve for their work:

"A Web site is a resume in color. When I'm booked for a speaking engagement and they aren't sure about my fee, my Web site convinces." So be sure that your Web site reflects your professionalism and your latest accomplishments.
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Today's Dietitian February 2003


Dietitians to the Stars


by Hannah Fiske

An article about dietitians with celebrity clients:

"Many celebrities who come to see me are totally confused because they need to be thin but just don't know what to eat. Some are naturally thin and have never had a problem with weight, but may have noticed their energy levels dropping because they are trying to follow all the latest diets and end up eating things that are completely wrong for them."

Once their eating habits are normalized, she adds, her clients feel so much better that they wonder why they never considered simple common sense in the first place.

"When I go to a reception with models and actresses, all I hear is, 'Don't bring me carbs, don't bring me carbs.' They have to be so slim that they can only eat just a little, so there seems to be no point in tasting the delicious desserts."

At most social functions, Musk adds, there is surprisingly very little healthy food to be had, and celebrities cannot afford to let themselves go to town on the fried, starchy foods. "They have to stick to fruits and vegetables, and have to search hard for some protein separated from the starch that will harm their caloric intake."

"It annoys me that people are often not offered more healthy choices. Sometimes, at certain high-society receptions, they serve trays of little vegetable and fish appetizers and the portions are very small. They are delicate and beautifully done. When you see them, you know you can get through the evening without having to go vegetarian."

Because, just like the rest of us, they enjoy eating and hate feeling hungry, Musk advises her celebrity clients to eat a large amount of vegetables and fruits every day. "When you add three fruits and four vegetables, it looks like so much food. It is also important to ensure that clients take in an appropriate amount of dairy, she adds, since they tend to eat unhealthfully when they work."

"When I was shooting a commercial a few weeks ago, we could eat a wonderful bowl of cereal with fruit and skim milk, or else wek could have a three-egg omelet with bacon and sausage. There are choices to be made, and the people working behind the scenes carrying all the heavy props need those calories."

Actors and models, however, should opt for the ligther fare, Musk says, despite the fact that many 18-year-old models she works with eat whatever they want and never develop a bulge. "It never occurs to them to load up with vegetables and fruit, though, because they are just typical teenagers."

Current Health 2, November 2003

South Africa: Many Influences
By Dee Murphy, R.D., L.D.

South Africa is home to many different cultures. For instance, one part of the country, Great Britain influences people’s tastes and manners. In other parts of the country, Portuguese, Jewish, Dutch, French, Indonesian, or Malay customs may dominate.
Some favorite foods include bobotie (meatloaf with curry), vegetables prepared with butter and sugar, koeksusters (fried twirled dough dipped in syrup), and biltong (dried salted meat). South Africans also eat elephant and Mopani worms, but tourists seldom do. Maye Musk, a registered dietitian in private practice in South Africa for 20 years before she moved to North America, says that she loves the traditional African food. “Puthu pap, a stiff cornmeal porridge that is served with meat, tomato, and onion sauce, is delicious,” says Musk. “It tastes very much like polenta [mush] but is white and looks like mashed potato. Because many Africans are lactose intolerant, the cooks are very happy when milk goes sour. Then it can be used to make sour puthu pap.”


Today's Dietitian November 2002


Blaming 'Big Food'

by Hannah Fiske

An article about a class action lawsuit filed against fast food companies:

Maye's opinion of the lawsuit: "I thought it was silly. In any other country, claims like this would be ignored; but, of course, America has more obese citizens than other countries."

"One has to wonder where, along the line, he misunderstood healthy eating and to what extent other people are responsible for that. Personally, I do not go into fast food restaurants. When I do, I know exactly what I am doing--I am having a wonderful binge." Even standing in line, she adds, it is not uncommon to hear other customers saying,"I really shouldn't be doing this to myself" or "I can't believe I'm eating this."

"If I gain weight, I would rather blame it on other people. But the truth is that if you are putting unhealthy food in your mouth, you are the only person you can blame."

Today's Dietitian August 2002


It's written all over your face: Evidence of lacking nutrients could be surfacing in your client's appearances

by Hannah Fiske

An article about how good nutrition can affect your appearance and health:

On her clients: "Some come to me out of concerns about pregnancy, high cholesterol, or other clinical conditions. But I would have to say that most of my clients, at least 80%, come to me for weight loss because they want to look better."

"When I first see overweight clients, they are often depressed and have little hope of improving their eating habits because they have tried every diet out there. But when they start losing weight, their energy goes up and so does their confidence. It gives me joy to see them almost bouncing into my office, looking so much happier."

"People are often embarrassed about showing their bodies when they have a better shape. But if they wear clothes that fit and get a flattering haircut, it can actually make them look slimmer and younger."

About her own appearance: "I would love to dress 'frumpy' and just be comfortable, but I take a few extra minutes every day to make sure I look good for my clients."

Today's Dietitian June 1999


Professional Image 101

by Jacqueline B. Marcus

An article about maintaining a professional image for dietitians:

"First impressions count. By being well-groomed and showing confidence, you'll look as though you can handle anything. People will notice your smile, mannerisms, ease, and the way you dress."

On Europeans: "They're not better nor wealthier. It's their attitude. They aren't really so good looking, they just think they are. They walk proudly, dress with style, and act as if the own the world. " This strong sense of self-worth, suggests Musk, "should be evident in your comportment. It will improve the way you deal with people as well as how you treat yourself."

To increase their confidence, Musk suggests that RDs find their niche in dietetics and become experts. "Speak at meetings and conferences and mentor others who seek knowledge." To look and feel more sophisticated, she recommends appearance readjustment. "Although registered dieticians are science types, they trust and want to be like people who take care of themselves." They should be up-to-date with the "perceived image of success."

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Another Parallel Careers Perspective

Counseling/speaking/writing/media work and modeling

I have been counseling, speaking, writing and doing media work for 33 years. I’ve been modeling for 38 years. This has been a juggling act with the various scheduling demands of my diverse careers.

Counseling and speaking are easier to schedule - you book clients, you counsel. Speaking is also easy to schedule - you get booked weeks to months ahead, you prepare your talk and you’re ready. Media work is not as easy- you get booked hours, days or weeks ahead. It’s the hour and day notice that can be a problem. If you’re called to go on the morning show tomorrow and you have your early clients booked, you have to call and change appointments. Hopefully you can get hold of everyone in time. Otherwise, you need to make other arrangements. When I was seeing 25 clients a day and had two offices and three dietitians working with me, I would usually have one of my colleagues see my clients. Working with the media has both positives and negatives. On the plus side media work brought in clients, and clients like to see their dietitian on television. The negative side is that clients don’t like surprises. They walk in and see a different dietitian than they expected. I explain that sometimes this is good for the client, as they can get a different perspective. Sometimes they prefer my associate and stay with her (I haven’t had male associates), which is rather humbling.

With modeling, I grew older as “older” models became popular. In some cities- Johannesburg, Toronto, San Francisco and Los Angeles- I would be booked three days to three months in advance, as there was little competition in my age group. Now in New York City, most of the jobs are for “lifestyle” models, who do banks and pharmaceuticals, and granny work where height is not a prerequisite. I have competition for the first time as actresses are at the auditions. This means I have to be available for auditions within a few hours. Jobs are often booked by 6 p.m. the day before. That results in even more juggling, throwing my appointments into disarray. To compensate, I book clients from 4 - 8 p.m., and will allow a few hours between daytime clients. Casting usually has a few hours’ window, which means I can run off between counseling clients. Fortunately my main office is in the center of the modeling district. TV commercial auditions have a specific time - in that case I need to move clients up or down an hour. That hasn’t been a problem in most cases.

When scheduling talks and media interviews, I do not take appointments and book out with my model agents on the same days. Usually I don’t tell my clients I model, as it sounds to frivolous. And certainly I don’t tell the fashion people on the set I am a dietitian, as they could spend the entire time telling me what they had for breakfast and chastising me for not keeping up to date on the latest supplements they take that have changed their lives. This can be most infuriating! Actually, modeling and nutrition appeared as a good mix for the first time recently. An article in the Wall Street Journal mentioned that Kraft used me, a model to create a “sexier image,” mentioning I was also a registered dietitian. I still model as it gets me out and it is fun when people see me in my Clinique Happy commercial and email me from all over the U.S., Canada and England.

Traveling on shoots can be very boring, and is an excellent time to edit articles and books or catch up on our huge reading piles. Thus, there is time to mesh two careers even when time to devote to the other may seem limited. I have also expanded my parallel careers, as I now give talks on image, using my modeling experience to help people look better and increase their self-esteem. This too, fits well with the healthy eating advice and support I provide my nutrition clients, keeping my parallel careers in sync.